Rio blog

We arrived in Rio two days before the opening of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. I was a little nervous and apprehensive about Rio. Media portrayal of the dangers of the Favelas (where we were staying), needing to watch your belongings at all times, “you’re bound to be pick pocketed at some stage”, anger and protests about how the Brazilian government and FIFA were neglecting the Brazilian people. I wasn’t so sure about it.

Fears dispelled

We arrived in Rio two days before the opening of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. I was a little nervous and apprehensive about Rio. Media portrayal of the dangers of the Favelas (where we were staying), needing to watch your belongings at all times, “you’re bound to be pick pocketed at some stage”, anger and protests about how the Brazilian government and FIFA were neglecting the Brazilian people. I wasn’t so sure about it.

Odede Blog

I’m a bit behind with my blog posts…. I had hoped to write one every week, but somehow, 6 weeks seems to have passed with me writing no blogs. I’m going to use the excuse that so much has happened in this last 6 weeks, since we arrived in Africa. There’s been so many things I’ve wanted to write down and share, but my experience has actually just been more about letting go of the “should” and allowing the experiences to unfold in its own way. It is now, as I sit here in the lovely seaside town of Paternoster in the West Cape in South Africa, getting ready to celebrate the wedding of two dear friends, that I feel ready and inspired to write.

Cherrapunjee: a world I never knew existed.

This blog post is written from a place I could have never thought existed; a fairy tale-like place, which can only be reached via a three hour hike down a valley. This village and its people are famous for their Living Root Bridges; man made bridges that have existed for over 500 years to support the locals to get around what is said to be the wettest place on earth. At the top of this hike is a village called Cherrapunjee; an incredible and unique place with beautiful people who welcomed us into their community and culture. 

Ubuntu Revisited

Cambodia was our first stop in our Ubuntu journey. Our experiences here have thrown us with full force into this project. The last two weeks have had us questioning what we’re doing, why we’re doing it, whether we have the ability to pull off even a fraction of what we’ve set out to achieve, and whether we even still feel connected and inspired by the philosophy. I guess that’s a pretty good outcome for our first country.